Schuler Books’ September Youth Reading Recommendations

Ann Arbor’s Schuler Books has gathered its updated list, for September, of books they would recommend for children and young adults. These lists provide ideas for all ages and help to provide some fresh literature choices to inspire your kids to read. 

For September, they feature some books that are sweet, some that are spooky, and one on censorship.

Book:  “Rick the Rock of Room 214

Type:  Picture Book

Description: Even rocks have dreams of adventure! Rick the Rock figures out how to escape from the ‘Nature Finds’ shelf that he has resided on for a very long time. But, with adventure comes danger. Will Rick regret his decision? – Christina

Book:  “Patchwork

Type: Picture Book

Description: A beautiful collaboration of art and text that reminds us we are NOT one note, nor stuck in our pigeon-holes. We are a symphony of notes and can celebrate the differences between each of us. – Christina

Book:  “Flight of the Puffin

Type:  Intermediate Readers

Description:  A fabulous story told from multiple perspectives interwoven together in a brilliant pattern that leaves the reader with several ‘Ah Ha’ moments. 

This book reminds you that the ripples of kindness that you put out in the world can have an immeasurable effect. – Christina

Book:  “Daybreak on Raven Island

Type: Intermediate Readers

Description: On a school trip to an island that is home to a very old abandoned prison/sanitarium, three kids deliberately miss the only boat back to the mainland so they can hunt for ghosts and maybe even make a film about their experience. Stranded overnight they soon have regrets as they try to solve a mystery and deal with ghosts! 

This is a great book for kids who like spooky suspense. – Linda

Book: Natural Genius of Ants 

Type: Intermediate Fiction

Description: When 10 yr old Harvard Corsan and his little brother Rodger go to Maine for the summer, they think it is just a trip to help console their physician father, who has had a patient die.

Once they reach their dad’s hometown of Kettle Hole they start an ant farm thinking it will be a fun hobby, however, when the ants arrive dead Harvard quickly switches some local ants without telling anyone, not realizing he has included a queen. 

This book is filled with charming small town events, which heal and bond the trio even closer together. It is a touching and wonderfully emotionally intelligent book, which parents and children alike will enjoy. – Meagen  

Book: “Key Player

Type:  Intermediate Readers

Description: Kelly Yangs’ Front Desk series is one of my favorites … and this newest addition is fantastic!

Mia Tang is a character that learns, that makes mistakes and that is SO relatable. “Key Player” revisits the Tang family and touches on important issues like discrimination, sexuality and self identity. – Christina

Book: “Attack of the Black Rectangles

Type:  Intermediate Readers

Description:  Although this book is outstanding … what piqued my interest most was that it was based on a real-life incident in the authors’ family. 

The timeliness of a book on censorship along with the authenticity of Kings’ voice make this a must read.  Amy Sarig King speaks so beautifully to children but also as an advocate for children.  – Christina

Book: “Weight of Blood

Type:  Young Adult

Description: So creepy and ominous … it kept me up way too late reading! No spoilers, but the end gives you hope. Great read with lots of contemporary issues addressed including racism, income disparity, and microaggressions. – Christina

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