Study guide

. October 26, 2012.
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“Best thing to tell your kid when they walk out the door”: ‘I love you. You look great. I’m proud of you. Have a great day.’ —John Boshoven, guidance department chair, Ann Arbor Public Schools

 “For middle schoolers, lockers and locks can cause anxiety.
Parents can help by providing locks to practice opening before the start of school.” — Gwen M. Bonnee, counselor, Ann Arbor Public Schools

“Most middle school children do not want to wake up early to eat breakfast and often do not have an appetite early in the morning. However, a high protein and vitamin-enriched breakfast is the best way to charge an adolescent's mind for learning and their body for sustaining a long, intense day. And it can help deter those ever-changing mood swings that adolescents are wrestling with throughout their day!” — Jessica Berner, middle school guidance counselor, Ann Arbor Public Schools

“Your kid is going to have homework. Period. Don’t ask if they have it. Ask them to show you the homework, then tell you their plan to complete it. A little down time is okay if their brain is fried, but getting homework out of the way earlier is better.” — John Boshoven, guidance
department chair, Ann Arbor Public Schools

 “Do not allow children access to electronics, cell phones, computers or television after 8 or 9 pm, and especially not in their bedrooms! Most electronics are hyper-stimulating and increase the chances that calm sleep will be delayed. Plus, it’s easy for both parents and children to lose track of the time spent on these devices, so the best advice is to eliminate them altogether.” — Jessica Berner, middle school guidance counselor, Ann Arbor Public Schools

“If your child experiences separation anxiety, let the teacher know. Teachers are accustomed to this and can help make the transition smoother. Agree with your child on how and where to say good-bye (a hug, a wave, at the entrance of the school, at the door of the classroom).” Barbara Naess, early grades educator, Honey Creek School, Ann Arbor
 

“It's important to have conversations with your children about how school is going in a way other than asking daily ‘how was school today?’ Try asking about a specific subject, or ‘what is something new you learned’, or ‘how did things go with your friends today’?. If you mix it up and ask something specific you may be pleasantly surprised to get an answer that says it was more than ‘fine’.” — Karel Graham, counselor, Ann Arbor Public Schools